Creativity

Everyday Creativity as the standard.

As a Trust we want all of our teams to be openly creative and push the limits on different ideas for teaching and learning. We actively encourage teachers to take risks and begin to question routine practice. 

 

 

Public Speaking Event- No Outsiders

In conjunction with Storyhouse in Chester as part of their festival of languages, Cheshire Academies Trust invited 16 schools to take part in our annual public speaking event. Three children from each school write speeches to deliver in the Garette Theatre for two minutes and then answer questions for two minutes. Their topic; when they have felt like an outsider. Supported by Andrew Moffet, creator the No Outsiders scheme of work, we were proud to listen to pupils speech that reolved around identity, friendship, illness and hope. 

 

Eleven by 11- An entitlement to our pupils

Eleven by 11 is a list of eleven activities or experiences that every child who attends a CAT academy will have experienced by the age of 11.

Pupils from academy School Councils came together to agree a list of 60 different experiences or skills they would like to have before they leave primary school. We were incredibly proud of the imaginative and innovative lists they presented us with. Later that term staff and parents/carers at our CAT academies were asked to vote on their top 20 from the lists the children had provided.

In September 2015 all Trust staff, Governors and Trustees came together at Chester Racecourse for our first whole Trust INSET event. In the afternoon workshop all these stakeholders worked together to decide our final list for eleven by 11.

Eleven by 11

1.Visit London

2.Learn to swim and water safety

3.Camp under stars, cook on a fire and look at the stars

4.Learn First Aid

5.Do something for charity

6.Plant it, Grow it, Eat it

7.Learn the basics of cooking

8.Perform on stage

9.Play a Musical Instrument

10.See the sea

11.Learn to ride a bike and road safety

 

Twisted Tales

Children from across the Trust have been working with Storyhouse Theatre in Chester to develop a Twisted Tales display.

The display was open for viewing during the Easter holidays and featured work from children throughout the schools based on well-known fairy tales, but with a twist.

Some children have explored the role of women within fairytales and used this as the basis for writing about the women’s suffrage movement (which is celebrating its centenary this year).

Others have looked at how characters such as wolves and giants are portrayed, and whether this is accurate.

Some of the younger children looked at alternative versions of fairytales, using them as inspiration to write recipes for porridge, diaries, instructions and their own stories.